2022 Honda Passport

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Overview

With a generous amount of cargo space and passenger accommodations, the 2022 Honda Passport is supremely practical. Those who need more than two rows of seats might want to step up to the three-row Honda Pilot, the Passport’s first cousin, but otherwise, the Passport is pleasantly capable in many ways. All models have an array of driver-assistance tech, from adaptive cruise control to lane-keeping assist. The sole power source is a stout V-6 that’s not especially fuel-efficient, but it provides deliberate acceleration. While it’s never exciting to drive and its ride can occasionally be rough, the 2022 Passport is a largely satisfying and hassle-free way of shuttling families and all their gear.

What’s New for 2022?

For 2022, Honda addresses one of our biggest complaints about the Passport: its anonymous appearance. It now has a bolder front end, thanks to a chunkier grille and squarer proportions, and its front and rear bumpers look more rugged. The new TrailSport model takes the off-road-inspired vibe even further with an exclusive 18-inch wheel-and-tire combo. Plus, it has slightly wider front and rear tracks that Honda says improve stability. The rest of the lineup has more subtle updates that include a newly standard rear-seat reminder, and the EX-L trim now has contrast stitching on its leather-appointed seats. As with the Honda Ridgeline, the Passport can now be equipped with the Honda Performance Development (HDP) appearance package, which includes a unique grille, black fender flares, specific wheels, and an HDP graphic on the rear fenders.

Engine, Transmission, and Performance

Under the hood are the same 280-hp 3.5-liter V-6 and nine-speed automatic transmission as found in the Pilot. Those who want the all-terrain capability of all-wheel drive can add it for extra; otherwise, the Passport is front-wheel drive. The SUV boasts 7.5 inches of ground clearance (8.1 inches for all-wheel-drive models), and the Passport can tow up to 5000 pounds. However, the two-row Honda has a rough ride when it does venture off-road, and its high ride height contributes to a top-heavy demeanor. Still, the Passport was quick in our testing, and it dutifully accelerates on the highway. The ride is comfortable on most roads, and the steering is pleasingly direct, which makes the Passport feel nimble.

Interior, Comfort, and Cargo

Anyone who has experienced the interior of the Ridgeline will be instantly familiar with the Passport’s cabin. Despite an unremarkable design, the materials are attractive enough and the controls are nicely organized—although we’d like more knobs and buttons instead of touchscreen controls. The front seats are wide and comfortable, with a handy armrest that can be adjusted for optimal comfort. The back seat is also roomy and allows the Passport to transport up to five people. There’s 41 cubic feet of storage space behind the rear seat, which held 15 of our carry-on suitcases. Folding that row unlocks 78 cubes of room and the capacity to carry 33 bags total. Interior cubby storage, in general, is great thanks to useful bins throughout the cabin and a huge center console bin.